FAQs

General

What IV locations are good candidates for monitoring?
Sensitivity is greatest when the IV is placed in a shallow vein. Sensitivity is decreased if the catheter is placed below the fascia. Placing the receptacle directly on the wrist and ankle should be avoided as these are areas with a lot of movement that could cause the receptacle to loosen or fall off.

What type of fluids should the ivWatch device be used with?
The ivWatch Model 400 is indicated for use with optically clear infusates. The ivWatch Model 400 may have reduced sensitivity if used with dark, colored or cloudy fluids.

How long will the monitor's battery last?
A full charge of the monitor’s battery will last for at least 5 hours when disconnected from a power source.

How should I clean the monitor and sensor cables?
Clean the monitor and power supply with disinfectant wipes. Allow to air dry. Clean the sensor cable with 2 PDI Super Sani-Cloth Germicidal disposable wipes. Repeat with 2 additional wipes. Allow Sensor Cable to air dry.

What are the terms and conditions for products purchased from ivWatch?

Notifications

Why does the monitor keep displaying a notification even though I do not see any signs of an infiltration?

The ivWatch Model 400 is able to detect infiltrations in very small volumes, before there would be any visual or physical signs of an infiltration. Make sure to check all connections and the security of the sensor receptacle. If a yellow or red notification has occurred, the patient’s IV should be checked more often.

What should I do if a yellow Check IV notification has been issued?

A yellow Check IV notification indicates a possible infiltration. You should follow your facility’s protocol for assessing the IV site. You can silence the audible notification for 2 minutes by pressing the mute button on the top right of the patient monitor. Pressing the Check IV button on the monitor will also silence the alarm for 1 hour and will display a yellow “Monitoring” screen if conditions still indicate a possible infiltration.

Verify that there are no kinks, bends, or breaks in the sensor cable and that the patient is not lying on the cable or receptacle. Also check the cable connections and that the receptacle is securely adhered on the patient. If the monitoring state has returned to normal, the status will change from the yellow “Monitoring” display to the blue “Monitoring” display.

The ivWatch Model 400 is able to detect infiltrations in very small volumes, before there would be any visual or physical signs of an infiltration. If the yellow “Monitoring” screen continues, it is suggested that the IV site be assessed more frequently.

What should I do if a red Check IV notification has been issued?

A red Check IV notification indicates a probable infiltration. You should follow your facility’s protocol for assessing the IV site. You can silence the audible notification for 2 minutes by pressing the mute button or Check IV button on the top right of the patient monitor. However, since the ivWatch monitor has indicated a probable infiltration, it will continue to provide an audible notification every 2 minutes until the monitoring run is restarted.

Push “Stop” to end the monitoring run and remove the red notification. Verify that there are no kinks, bends, or breaks in the sensor cable and that the patient is not lying on the cable or receptacle. Also check the cable connections, and that the receptacle is securely adhered on the patient.

The monitor must be reset to continue monitoring by stopping and restarting the monitoring run. When starting a new monitoring session, select “New” if a new IV was placed or “Existing” if the existing IV is being monitored. However, when the monitoring run is reset, the monitor will need to establish a new baseline reading. If an infiltration is present, the baseline will be taken from infiltrated tissue. Thus, it may take longer for the device to issue a new notification depending on the rate of the infusion and the extent of the infiltration.

The ivWatch Model 400 is able to detect infiltrations in very small volumes, before there would be any visual or physical signs of an infiltration. If there is a red Check IV notification, it is suggested that the IV site be assessed more frequently.

Sensor Cable

How do I tape the sensor cable to a patient?

It is highly recommended that the sensor cable is taped as shown below. Do not place tape immediately behind the sensor; doing so could reduce the monitor’s sensitivity or potentially cause false notifications by lifting the sensor from the skin over time. It may be helpful to place a piece of gauze behind the sensor for extremely active patients, or when the sensor is placed on or near an area of flexion.

How do I remove the sensor cable from the monitor?

Grasp both sides of strain relief and gently rock side-to-side. Do not pull straight down or use force while removing.

How do I test the quality of a sensor cable?

The monitor has a test port located on the front that can be used to test the condition of the sensor cable. With the sensor head inserted with the flat, black side up, you can then run a Sensor Test to determine if the sensor is functioning normally or not. See our Troubleshooting Guide for additional details around performing a sensor test.

Receptacle

How far from the IV catheter can I place the sensor?

Preferably, the receptacle should be placed adjacent to the catheter tip not to exceed one inch from the hub. The device will still work if placed further away, however, the further the receptacle is from the catheter, the larger the infiltration volume required to trigger a notification.

How can I keep the sensor receptacle from becoming loose or falling off?

Medical tape can be placed over the side flaps and along the front of the sensor receptacle. The tape should be placed before a receptacle has loosened or fallen off. If a part of the receptacle has lost its adhesion to the patient, we recommend that the receptacle be replaced and then secured in place with tape, rather than using the tape to hold down the area that has come off.

For situations when a patient is sweating at the placement site, the area can be wiped down with an alcohol wipe then covered with Cavilon before placing the receptacle on the patient.

How should I place the dressing over the sensor receptacle?

Cover the injection site with an occlusive dressing according to facility protocols. The occlusive dressing should not be placed over the blue portion of the ivWatch receptacle.

Can I place the sensor receptacle over the IV dressing?

Yes, the sensor will still work if placed over the IV dressing. Ensure that the sensor has a clear line of sight to the skin. Thus, the sensor should be place only over clear portions of the dressing.

When should I insert and remove the sensor head from the sensor receptacle?

To avoid damaging the sensor cable, the sensor head should be placed in the receptacle prior to placing it on the patient. Hold the cable as close to the sensor head as possible as you insert the cable into the receptacle. You should hear an audible click when the bump on the sensor head is completely entered into the receptacle notch. When removing the sensor from a patient, the receptacle should first be removed from the patient’s skin and then pull up on the blue tab of the receptacle to slide the sensor head out, again holding the sensor cable as close to the sensor head as possible.

What can I do to make the sensor receptacle come off the patient more easily?

Alcohol wipes can be used on and around the area of the receptacle to weaken the adhesive.

Can I reuse a receptacle?

No. The adhesive of the receptacle is designed for a single use. The receptacle needs to be replaced even if the receptacle is pulled off to reposition it on the same patient. It is crucial to replace receptacles that have become loose or were removed as the sensor requires adhesion close to the surface of the skin to perform continuous monitoring.

Additional Resources and Manuals

For product pricing, and purchasing information: 1-855-489-2824, Option 1
or Email: sales@ivwatch.com

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